Film has been essential to my process of understanding my own identity. In college I was given a copy of First Person Plural, a documentary by Deann Borshay Liem, a Korean adoptee who recorded her journey to Korea to meet her biological family. The film brought me to tears almost immediately, I assume because of how deeply I felt I could relate to the filmmaker’s life story, and the realization that I knew so little about my own relationship with adoption and the country of my birth. Hearing her words felt like she was exposing all of these personal thoughts I had about adoption that I never could articulate on my own. I remember while watching that film, I felt a connection to a diasporic community of confusion, loss, and trauma that was both frightening and comforting at the same time.  I remember thinking then that I would need to travel to Korea at some point in my life.
Next weekend, the first annual Adoptee Art and Film Festival will take place in Seoul, showcasing films and other works of art by Korean adoptees from around the world, including the second documentary by Deann Borshay Liem. Too often is the topic of adoption silenced in Korea because of language barriers, social stigma, and embarrassment. I am looking forward to attending this festival with the knowledge that this gathering of adoptee artists and their works will inspire and empower, creating a greater cultural awareness of Korean adoptees in the country where we all came from. http://aaff.co

Film has been essential to my process of understanding my own identity. In college I was given a copy of First Person Plural, a documentary by Deann Borshay Liem, a Korean adoptee who recorded her journey to Korea to meet her biological family. The film brought me to tears almost immediately, I assume because of how deeply I felt I could relate to the filmmaker’s life story, and the realization that I knew so little about my own relationship with adoption and the country of my birth. Hearing her words felt like she was exposing all of these personal thoughts I had about adoption that I never could articulate on my own. I remember while watching that film, I felt a connection to a diasporic community of confusion, loss, and trauma that was both frightening and comforting at the same time.  I remember thinking then that I would need to travel to Korea at some point in my life.

Next weekend, the first annual Adoptee Art and Film Festival will take place in Seoul, showcasing films and other works of art by Korean adoptees from around the world, including the second documentary by Deann Borshay Liem. Too often is the topic of adoption silenced in Korea because of language barriers, social stigma, and embarrassment. I am looking forward to attending this festival with the knowledge that this gathering of adoptee artists and their works will inspire and empower, creating a greater cultural awareness of Korean adoptees in the country where we all came from. http://aaff.co
homemade midnight 김치찌개

homemade midnight 김치찌개

Tags #kimchi    #seoul    #korea    #jjigae   

Tags #seoul    #hangul